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Mapping Virginia - Exhibition Virtual Tour Lesson Plans

The examination and study of primary sources is an essential part of education. Maps, documents, photographs, newspapers, broadsides, diaries, and books are testaments to Virginia's rich and varied history. Specifically, maps help guide students through Virginia'history and open new avenues to learning.

Lesson plans correspond with the Virginia Department of Education's Social Studies Standards of Learning, as identified in parentheses.

Surveyors and Mapmakers

Using the map, Survey of 330 Acres for Edward Hogan, George Washington, 1 November 1749 (manuscript), have students compare and contrast the characteristics of surveyors and mapmakers.
(S.O.L.: K.2, 1.8, 3.6, 4.1, 4.2, C/T 5.3, C/T 8.4, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.10, 10.15 and 11.1)

Using the map, Levelling, from A Treatise of Practical Surveying, Robert Gibson, 1808 (bound volume), have students discuss the terms and characteristics of elevation and legends of maps.
(S.O.L.: K.2, 1.6, 1.8, 2.5, 3.6, 4.2, 4.9, C/T 5.3, C/T 8.4, 10.1 and 10.15)

Using the map, Survey of 765 Acres for Charles Carter, John Warner, 24 April 1728 (manuscript), have students, working as groups, determine why people live near water.
(S.O.L.: 1.7, 4.2, 4.7, 5.1, C/T 5.3,8.3, C/T 8.5, 9.5, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.4, 10.5, 10.6, 10.7, 10.9 and 10.15)

Mapping Technology

Using the map, Map of the Rebel Capital, from The New York Herald, 12 November 1863 (newspaper), have students write an essay describing why maps would be used in newspapers.
(S.O.L.: 1.8, 1.9, 3.13, 4.4, 4.7, C/T 5.3, 5.6, 5.9, 5.10, 6.2, 6.5, 6.6, 6.10, 6.11, 7.3, 7.10, C/T 8.4, 10.3, 10.12, 10.15, 11.8 and 11.17)

Using the map, Map of the Battle of Greenbrier River, A. T. McRae, CSA, 1861 (woodcut engraving), have students discuss in groups the reasons for using symbols on maps.
(S.O.L.: 1.6, 2.5, 3.6, 4.2, 4.7, C/T 5.3, 7.10, C/T 8.4, 10.1 and 10.15)

Using the map, Birds Eye View of Alexandria, Va., Charles Magnus, 1863 (colored lithograph), have students write an essay discussing how maps can be classified as art.
(S.O.L.: K.3, 3.6, 4.7, C/T 5.3, 6.10, 8.3, 8.4, C/T 8.4, 9.3, 10.1, 10.3 and 10.15)

Using the map, Chesapeake Bay Watershed, United States Geological Survey (1997), have students discuss, as groups, how maps have changed with the introduction of new technologies.
(S.O.L.: 3.2, 4.1, 4.2, 4.6, C/T 5.3, 5.6, C/T 8.4, 9.9, 9.11, 10.2, 10.3, 10.6, 10.15, 11.18 and 11.15)

Vision of Empire

Using the map, Americae Sive Novi Orbis, nova descrptio, Abraham Ortelius, 1587 (Hand-colored engraving), have students list the continents found on this map.
(S.O.L.: 1.6, 1.8, 2.5, 3.2, 3.5, 4.1, C/T 5.3, 7.10, C/T 8.4, 10.1, 10.3 and 10.15)

Using the map, Virginia, John Smith, 1627 (engraving), have students write a story using the symbolism shown on the map.
(S.O.L.: K.2, K.3, K.4, 1.1, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 3.2, 3.6, 4.1, 4.2, 4.7, 5.1, C/T 5.3, 6.10, 7.10, 8.2, C/T 8.4, 10.1, 10.3, 10.5 and 10.15)

Using the map, Pas Kaart van de Zee Kerstan van Virginia, Johannis Van Keulen, 1685 hand-colored engraving), have students trace coastal navigation and trade in the colonies.
(S.O.L.: 1.7, 3.5, 3.6, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, C/T 5.3, C/T 8.4, 9.5, 9.11, 10.1, 10.5, 10.7, 10.10 and 10.15)

Using the map, A Map of the most Inhabited part of Virginia, Joshua Fry and Peter Jefferson, 1755 hand-colored engraving), have students identify the economic advantages of colonial Virginia's location on the Atlantic Ocean.
(S.O.L.: 1.7, 2.6, 3.3, 3.5, 4.3, 4.7, 5.3, C/T5.3, 5.9, 5.10, 7.1, 7.10, C/T 8.4, 9.5, 9.11, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.7, 10.9, 10.15, 11.1, 11.2 and 11.17)

Building a Commonwealth

Using the map, Map of the State of Virginia, Herman Boye, engraving by Henry S. Tanner, 1827 (hand-colored engraving), have students determine the states that bordered Virginia in 1827.
(S.O.L.: K.2, 1.6, 1.8, 2.4, 3.6, 4.2, 4.7, C/T 5.3, C/T 8.4 and 10.1)

Using the map, Plan of the Great Kanawha River, Loammi Baldwin, 1818 (manuscript), have students list the pros and cons of living on a river.
(S.O.L.: 1.7, 2.6, 3.3, 3.5, 4.3, 4.7, 5.3, C/T5.3, 5.9, 5.10, 7.1, 7.10, C/T 8.4, 9.5, 9.11, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.7, 10.9, 10.15, 11.1, 11.2 and 11.17)

Using the map, Map of a Survey from Lynchburg to Lexington, Claudius Crozet, 1827 (manuscript), have students discuss, as groups, how riverfront cities were developed.
(S.O.L.: 1.7, 2.6, 3.3, 3.5, 4.3, 4.7, 5.3, C/T5.3, 5.9, 5.10, 7.1, 7.10, C/T 8.4, 9.5, 9.11, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.7, 10.9, 10.15, 11.1, 11.2 and 11.17)

Using the map, Map & Profile of the Virginia & Tennessee Railroad, W. W. Blackford, 1856 (colored lithograph), have students analyze the railroads in the economic development of Virginia.
(S.O.L.: K.2, K.3, K.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 2.5, 3.6, 4.2, 4.7, C/T 5.3, 5.9, C/T 8.4, 10.1, 10.15 and 11.15)

Using the map, A Map of the Internal Improvements of Virginia, Claudius Crozet, 1848 (lithograph), have students use their map reading skills to give the meaning of the colors on the map and to explain why mapping state improvements is important.
(S.O.L.: K.4, 1.8, 3.6, 4.4, 4.7, C/T 5.3, 5.6, 6.4, 6.7, 7.6, 7.7, 7.10, 10.2, 10.6, 10.9, 10.15, 11.8 and 11.17)

Using the map, South West Virginia Resources, C. R. Boyd, 1881 (colored lithograph), have students compare and contrast the main map to the elevation insert.
(S.O.L.: K.2, K.3, K.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 2.5, 3.6, 4.2, 4.7, C/T 5.3, 5.9, C/T 8.4, 10.1, 10.15 and 11.15)

The Geography of Culture

Using the map, Map of Virginia Showing the distribution of Its Slave Population, Henry S. Graham, 1861 (lithograph), have students evaluate the community population composite and Virginia's involvement in the slave labor system.
(S.O.L.: 3.6, 4.7, 5.3, C/T 5.3, 5.9, C/T 8.4, 10.1, 10.15, 11.5 and 11.15)

Using the map, Map of Virginia — "Wet" and "Dry" and Comparative "Wet" and "Dry" United States, 1909 (engraving), have students identify the geographic relation of Virginia to surrounding states.
(S.O.L.: K.3, 1.5, 2.4, 3.6, 4.7, C/T 5.3, 5.9, C/T 8.4, 10.1, 10.15 and 11.15)

Using the map, Virginia Official State Transportation Map, 1998, have students discuss in writing how their community has changed over time.
(S.O.L.: 1.5, 2.2, 3.6, 4.7, C/T 5.3, 5.9, C/T 8.4, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.4, 10.5, 10.15 and 11.15)

Using the map, Policy # 811 for Samuel G. Adams, Mutual Assurance Society of Virginia, 24 March 1817 (manuscript), have students working as groups list and discuss the business uses of maps.
(S.O.L.: K.5, 3.6, 3.8, 4.2, 4.7, C/T 5.3, 5.9, C/T 8.4, 10.1, 10.15, 11.8 and 11.15)

Using the map, Section F from Illustrated Atlas of Richmond, F. W. Beers, 1876 (colored lithograph), have students analyze the various types of that can be obtained through reading maps.
(S.O.L.: K.2, K.3, K.4, 2.5, 3.6, 4.2, C/T 5.3, 5.9, C/T 8.4, 10.1, 10.15 and 11.15)

Using the map, Lynchburg City Plan, City Planning Commission, 1934 (colored lithograph), have students evaluate in writing the characteristics that unify or divide a geographic region.
(S.O.L.: 1.5, 2.2, 3.6, 4.1, 4.2, 4.7, C/T 5.3, 5.9, C/T 8.4, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.4, 10.15 and 11.15)