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March 2011

"Books on Broad" Featuring Lenore Hart: The Raven's Bride
Thursday, March 10, 2011
Time: 5:30 PM–7:30 PM
Place: The Virginia Shop

The March installment of Books on Broad will feature Lenore Hart on her latest novel, The Raven's Bride, about the mysterious and confounding relationship between Edgar Allan Poe and Sissy Clemm, his great love and constant companion. The book explores love, loss, the afterlife, and American literature's most haunted and demonized literary figure, by imagining the real, beating heart of the woman who loved and inspired him—and whose absence ultimately destroyed him. Light refreshments (wine and cheese) served, 5:30–6:15 pm; author talk and discussion, 6:15–7:00 pm; book signing, 7:00–7:30 pm.


Poetry Reading by Jehanne Dubrow, Tara Bray, and William Notter
Thursday, March 10, 2011
Time: 6:00 PM–8:00 PM
Place: Visual Arts Center of Richmond, 1812 W. Main St., 804-353-0094

Poets Jehanne Dubrow (finalist for VCU's 2010 Levis Reading Prize), Tara Bray, and William Notter will read at the Visual Arts Center of Richmond as part of the Fresh Ink reading series. The event is free and open to the public. Fresh Ink is a year-long reading series featuring emerging writers and co-sponsored by Blackbird/New Virginia Review, Chop Suey Books, the Library of Virginia, and the Visual Arts Center of Richmond.


Lafayette: Lessons in Leadership from the Idealist General

Lafayette: Lessons in Leadership from the Idealist General
Wednesday, March 16, 2011
Time: Noon–1:00 PM
Place: Conference Rooms

Historian Marc Leepson will discuss and sign his new book about the Marquis de Lafayette, an icon of American—and French—history. Leepson offers an insightful account of the great general, whose love of liberty and passionate devotion to American and French independence shine in the pages of history. Born into an aristocratic French family, made lieutenant in the French Royal Guard at age 14, and married into the royal family at 16, he traveled to the colonies at his own expense to fight in the American Revolution. By age 20, he was embraced by George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, who became his life-long friends.


To Collect, Protect, and Serve Book Release

To Collect, Protect, and Serve Book Release
Thursday, March 17, 2011
Time: 4:00 PM–7:30 PM
Place: The Virginia Shop

Tameka Hobbs will sign copies of To Collect, Protect, and Serve: Behind the Scenes at the Library of Virginia. The Library of Virginia is the oldest cultural institution in the state and the official archive (a place where history is kept) and library of the Commonwealth. In the book To Collect, Protect, and Serve: Behind the Scenes at the Library of Virginia, Archie the Archivist, Libby the Librarian, and Connie the Conservator guide young readers through a visit to the Library of Virginia. The book lets children explore some of the Library's most important holdings—an early copy of the Declaration of Independence, the Statute for Religious Freedom, and documents connected to famous Virginians like George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, George Mason, and Edgar Allan Poe. They will learn how archivists, librarians, and conservators battle against the threats to historical documents like the Archival Enemies—Mildred Mold, Bartholomew B. Bug, and Liquid Lenny—to keep Virginia's history safe for the future. The first 50 elementary teachers will receive a FREE copy of the book. The Virginia Shop will be offering a special discount to educators throughout the evening. More Information »


Union or Secession Exhibition Guided Tour
Saturday, March 19, 2011
Time: 11:00 AM–Noon
Place: Exhibition Gallery & Lobby, Space is limited. Call (804) 692-3901 to register.

What were Virginians thinking and discussing as the first Southern states withdrew from the United States following the election of Abraham Lincoln in November 1860? Why was Virginia’s decision critical to America’s fate in 1861 and key to the ultimate course and outcome of the sectional crisis? Virginia was central to American identity for its role in the founding of the United States and its political principles. Union or Secession explores what Virginians thought and debated as the crisis unfolded. Explore the choices Virginians faced as they decided their fate and the lasting consequences of their decisions for Virginia and the nation.


Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood

Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood
Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Time: Noon–1:00 PM
Place: Conference Rooms

Authors Ellen F. Brown and John Wiley, Jr. will discuss and sign their new book, Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller’s Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood. This entertaining and informative account traces Gone With the Wind from its origins in the Civil War–era experiences of Mitchell’s relatives through its status today as a pop culture icon that still generates impressive profits for her estate.


2011 Virginia Women in History: Program and Reception
Thursday, March 24, 2011
Time: 6:00 PM–8:00 PM
Place: Lecture Hall & Lobby

Free but reservations required. Seating is limited. Call 804-692-3900 by March 18 to RSVP.
Join the Library of Virginia as it recognizes eight outstanding Virginia women—past and present—who have made important contributions to Virginia, the nation, and the world. A reception follows the program. Sponsored by Dominion.

Event Photo Gallery


Straight to the Source Conference
Friday, March 25, 2011
Time: 9:00 AM–3:30 PM
Place: Conference Rooms

The Friends of the Virginia State Archives hold their annual spring conference at the Library. For fee and registration information, contact straight.to.the.source@gmail.com.


Union or Secession Exhibition Guided Tour
Saturday, March 26, 2011
Time: 11:00 AM–Noon
Place: Exhibition Gallery & Lobby, Space is limited. Call (804) 692-3901 to register.

What were Virginians thinking and discussing as the first Southern states withdrew from the United States following the election of Abraham Lincoln in November 1860? Why was Virginia’s decision critical to America’s fate in 1861 and key to the ultimate course and outcome of the sectional crisis? Virginia was central to American identity for its role in the founding of the United States and its political principles. Union or Secession explores what Virginians thought and debated as the crisis unfolded. Explore the choices Virginians faced as they decided their fate and the lasting consequences of their decisions for Virginia and the nation.


SRC Late Opening
Wednesday, March 30, 2011
Place: State Records Center

The State Records Archives Annex Reading Room will open at 10:00 AM on Wednesday, March 30, 2011 due to an all-staff agency meeting


Union or Secession: Virginians Decide
Monday, December 06, 2010—Saturday, October 29, 2011

Time: Monday–Saturday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Place: Library of Virginia, Exhibition Gallery and Lobby Cases


Virginia was central to American identity for its role in the founding of the United States and its political principles. Both the Confederacy and the Union wanted to claim Virginia's historical legacy. Union or Secession explores what Virginians thought and debated as the crisis unfolded. Explore the choices Virginians faced as they decided their fate and that of the nation—Union or Secession.

Through letters, journals, newspapers, official documents and correspondence, and maps and broadsides (the vast majority of these items from the Library's incomparable collections), Union or Secession offers insight into the complex and conflicting geographic, cultural, economic, and political factors that faced Virginians in 1860 and early 1861. The exhibition shows that Virginians' choice on the question of secession was far from certain as dramatic moves were being made outside the state.


The Struggle to Decide: Virginia's Secession Crisis
Monday, December 13, 2010—Saturday, October 29, 2011

Time: Monday–Saturday 8:00 AM–5:00 PM and Sundays from 1:00–5:00 PM
Place: Virginia State Capitol Visitor Center, 1000 Bank Street, Richmond 23219


An exhibition presented by the Library of Virginia

In the aftermath of the election of Abraham Lincoln as U.S. president in 1860, and the beginning of the secession crisis in December 1860, Virginia had a fateful choice to make: would it remain in, or secede from, the United States of America? In Virginia, the General Assembly called for a state convention to act for Virginia during the crisis. Meeting in February 1861, the 152 men elected to the convention faced the terrible task of deciding the fate of Virginia, and perhaps the nation.

The Struggle to Decide exhibition examines the actions taken by convention delegates and the governor that had a profound effect on Richmond and the Virginia State Capitol.