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Wednesday, January 16, 2013

POSTPONED
A Virginia Story: A Discussion with Earl Hamner Jr. moderated by Lisa LaFata Powell

Wednesday, January 16, 2013
Time: 6:30 PM
Place: Lecture Hall,  POSTPONED INDEFINITELY due to the illness of Mr. Hamner.

Please be advised that A Virginia Story: A Discussion with Earl Hamner Jr. moderated by Lisa LaFata Powell, scheduled for the evening of January 16, has been postponed due to the illness of Mr. Hamner. The program has tentatively been rescheduled for April 2.

Join the Library of Virginia as we celebrate the gift of the private papers and manuscript collection of Earl Hamner Jr. The personal story of Earl Hamner and his family and the hundreds of stories he has created over the years have touched millions of people around the world. Representing the best of Virginia and the history of Virginia, his work makes this a truly significant collection. The Hamner collection includes original manuscripts for the entire runs of the television series The Waltons and Falcon Crest, original manuscripts for several television pilots, and more than 60 years of his original correspondence, as well as short stories, poems, and photographs. Lisa LaFata Powell will moderate a discussion with Hamner about his work, his life, and his love of Virginia. Special items from his collection will be on display during the event.


You Have No Right: Law and Justice
Monday, September 24, 2012 — Saturday, May 18, 2013
Place: Exhibition Hall,  Free

Using Virginia cases—and the stories of the people behind them—You Have No Right: Law and Justice will demonstrate how the law affects individuals directly and how people have used the law to achieve political and social goals. Using original records and electronic resources to convey the themes of human rights, citizenship, and the rule of law in a lively and engaging presentation, visitors will explore questions about citizenship, marriage rights, eminent domain, and why prosecutors have to prove guilt and defense lawyers don't have to prove innocence.