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Wednesday, March 13, 2013

“Pinning” Gabriel's Rebellion
Wednesday, March 13, 2013
Time: Noon–1:00 PM
Place: Lecture Hall,  Free

Using the (relatively) new website HistoryPin (www.historypin.com), historians Gregg Kimball, Michael Nicholls, and Phil Schwarz trace the activities and events leading up to the best-planned—and potentially most damaging—slave insurrection in Virginia. The region's geography and the Library's documents are merged on the website to graphically depict the actions and aftermath of the Henrico bondsman. This program is presented in partnership with VCU Libraries.


"Books on Broad" featuring Historic Richmond Foundation and Richmond Landmarks
Wednesday, March 13, 2013
Time: 5:30 PM–7:30 PM
Place: Conference Rooms

Richmond Landmarks & Official Guide to Historic Richmond
This Books on Broad will be presented in partnership with Historic Richmond Foundation and will feature two local history books that celebrate the notable cultural and historic sites of Richmond, Virginia. The Official Guide to Historic Richmond is an updated publication featuring images and information about architecturally and historically significant sites in Richmond. Richmond Landmarks includes over 200 images from the Library of Virginia's historic photographs collection with an historic overview of the city. Our usual wine and cheese reception will be followed by slideshow presentations focused on the historic sites of Richmond and ongoing historic preservation efforts by Historic Richmond Foundation.


You Have No Right: Law and Justice
Monday, September 24, 2012 — Saturday, May 18, 2013
Place: Exhibition Hall,  Free

Using Virginia cases—and the stories of the people behind them—You Have No Right: Law and Justice will demonstrate how the law affects individuals directly and how people have used the law to achieve political and social goals. Using original records and electronic resources to convey the themes of human rights, citizenship, and the rule of law in a lively and engaging presentation, visitors will explore questions about citizenship, marriage rights, eminent domain, and why prosecutors have to prove guilt and defense lawyers don't have to prove innocence.