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Saturday, April 06, 2013

Walking Tours of the 1863 Richmond Bread Riot
Saturday, April 06, 2013
Place: Library of Virginia,  Free

Gregg Kimball, director of Public Services and Outreach, will collaborate with the National Park Service's Richmond National Battlefield Park on walking tours starting at 11:00 AM and 3:00 PM of the 1863 Bread Riot in Richmond, where thousands of local women stormed area stores in protest of the lack of food and supplies. This event is part of Civil War & Emancipation Day. More than 25 sites are offering tours and programs. For more information, visit http://civilwar.emancipationday.net.


Civil War 150 Legacy Project Scanning Event
Saturday, April 06, 2013
Time: 10:00 AM–2:00 PM
Place: Conference Rooms,  Free

The Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission and the Library of Virginia are partnering to identify and locate original manuscript material concerning the Civil War. These materials may include letters, photographs, diaries, maps, and other Civil War–era materials. Library staff members will scan privately held manuscript material for inclusion on the websites of both the Library and the commission. Items to be scanned should document the Civil War or the Civil-War era and must be owned by the individual presenting the materials for digitization. Materials that are photocopied and/or subject to United States copyright law may not be submitted for digitization. For more information, contact the project's regional coordinators at cw150legacy@lva.virginia.gov. To make an appointment, please contact Renee Savits at 804-692-3629 or renee.savits@lva.virginia.gov. This event is part of the annual Civil War & Emancipation Day commemorating the 150th anniversaries of the Civil War and the end of slavery.


You Have No Right: Law and Justice
Monday, September 24, 2012 — Saturday, May 18, 2013
Place: Exhibition Hall,  Free

Using Virginia cases—and the stories of the people behind them—You Have No Right: Law and Justice will demonstrate how the law affects individuals directly and how people have used the law to achieve political and social goals. Using original records and electronic resources to convey the themes of human rights, citizenship, and the rule of law in a lively and engaging presentation, visitors will explore questions about citizenship, marriage rights, eminent domain, and why prosecutors have to prove guilt and defense lawyers don't have to prove innocence.