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Friday, May 05, 2017

PERFORMANCE<br>

PERFORMANCE
"Goodbye, Booze": The Music of Prohibition (with a Beer Chaser)

Friday, May 05, 2017
Time: 5:30 PM–7:30 PM
Place: Lecture Hall & Lobby

See the exhibition Teetotalers & Moonshiners: Prohibition in Virginia, Distilled, enjoy some music, and try a beer crafted especially for the exhibition. Drawing on sheet music, period recordings, and anti-liquor songbooks, this event captures the debates over temperance and Prohibition through the music of the era. A reception featuring “Last Call” Imperial Brown Ale, created by the Library in collaboration with Three Notch'd Brewing Company, follows the music program. Enjoy live performances of songs that advocated temperance, documented the growth of a clandestine alcohol business (moonshine), and lampooned Prohibition and the efforts to enforce it, along with narration to place the music within its historical context. Performers include Kinney Rorrer, Mark Campbell, and sisters Samantha Willis and Jessi Johnson. Also featured are recordings of well-known Virginia artists such as Charlie Poole and the North Carolina Ramblers (which had deep ties to Franklin County), Bela Lam and His Greene County Singers, and Sister Rosetta Tharpe, a Richmond-area resident during her heyday. This event is supported in part by a grant from the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and Public Policy. The reception is sponsored by Virginia Distillery Company.


EXHIBITION
Teetotalers & Moonshiners: Prohibition in Virginia, Distilled

Monday, April 03, 2017 — Saturday, December 02, 2017
Place: Exhibition Gallery & Lobby, Free

Which Virginia county is the Moonshine Capital of the World? The Library of Virginia's upcoming exhibition, Teetotalers & Moonshiners: Prohibition in Virginia, Distilled, will reveal that and more as it explores the impact of Prohibition on the Old Dominion. On November 1, 1916, Virginia's breweries and distilleries closed their doors as the state began a grand experiment in Prohibition. From that date until 1933, state inspectors and federal agents attempted to stem the flow of illicit alcohol to a thirsty populace. Newsreels of still-busting raids, music from the Jazz Age, and vintage stills will complement the archival record of the exploits of Virginia's Prohibition Commission. This exhibition is supported in part by the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control and the National Alcohol Beverage Control Association.