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Maps and Formation Information for Campbell through Cumberland Counties


Campbell CountyCampbell County was named for William Campbell, one of the heroes of the Battle of Kings Mountain in 1780.  The county was formed from Bedford County in 1781.  Its area is 511 square miles, and the county seat is Rustburg.  [Back]
 

Caroline CountyCaroline County was named for Caroline of Anspach, consort of George II.  It was formed from Essex, King and Queen, and King William Counties in 1728, and additional parts of King and Queen were added in 1742 and 1762.  Its area is 549 square miles, and the county seat is Bowling Green.  [Back]


Carroll CountyCarroll County was named for Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence from Maryland.  It was formed from Grayson County in 1842, and part of Patrick County was added in 1856.  Its area is 497 square miles, and the county seat is Hillsville. [Back]


Charles City CountyCharles City County was named for Charles I of England and was one of the eight shires established in 1634.  Its area is 204 square miles, and the county seat is Charles City.  [Back]


Charles River CountyCharles River County was named for Charles I of England and was one of the eight shires established in 1634.  It was renamed York County in 1643, probably in honor of James, duke of York, the second son of Charles I.  See York County. [Back]


Charlotte CountyCharlotte County was named for Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, consort of George III.  It was formed from Lunenburg County in 1764.  Its area is 471 square miles, and the county seat is Charlotte Court House. [Back]


Chesterfield CountyChesterfield County was named for Philip Dormer Stanhope, fourth earl of Chesterfield, British statesman and diplomat, and was formed from Henrico County in 1749.  Its area is 446 square miles, and the county seat is Chesterfield.  [Back]


Clarke CountyClarke County was named for George Rogers Clark (spelled without an e), who helped win the Northwest Territory for Virginia during the Revolution.  The county was formed from Frederick County in 1836, and part of Warren County was added in 1860.  Its area is 174 square miles, and the county seat is Berryville.  [Back]


Craig CountyCraig County was named for Robert Craig, a nineteenth-century Virginia congressman.  The county was formed from Botetourt, Roanoke, Giles, and Monroe (West Virginia) Counties in 1851.  Parts of Monroe County were added in 1853 and 1856, part of Montgomery County was added in 1853, part of Alleghany County added in 1856, and part of Giles County added in 1858.  Its area is 336 square miles, and the county seat is New Castle. [Back]


Culpeper CountyCulpeper County probably was name for Catherine Culpeper, or for her mother, Margaret Lady Culpeper, or for Thomas Culpeper, second baron Culpeper of Thoresway, governor of Virginia from 1677 to 1683, or for their family, which long held proprietary right in the Northern Neck.  It was formed from Orange County in 1749.  Its area is 389 square miles, and the county seat is Culpeper.  [Back]


Cumberland CountyCumberland County was named for William Augustus, duke of Cumberland, third son of George II.  It was formed from Goochland County in 1749.  Its area is 298 square miles, and the county seat is Cumberland. [Back]