September 2021 Events
closing

Closed for Labor Day Holiday

TimeMonday, September 6, 2021 from 9:00 AM–5:00 PM

book club

Literary Virginia Book Group

TimeWednesday, September 8, 2021 from 6:00 PM–7:30 PM
LocationOrientation Room or Online
PriceFree

Beginning this fall, our meetings will be hybrid—you can join in person at the Library or online through Zoom. Please log in at 6:00 PM through either the Zoom link or the phone number below:


Zoom Meeting:

https://zoom.us/j/93740664507?pwd=aUc4cXoyeGxFZW5YbXdudzBXVU12dz09

Meeting ID: 937 4066 4507

Passcode: 469804


One tap mobile

+13017158592,,93740664507#,,,,*469804# US (Washington DC)

Dial by your location

+1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)

Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/aeAihCyrav


Read and discuss the best of today's Virginia literature—including books by Library of Virginia Literary Award winners and finalists in fiction and nonfiction. On the second Wednesday evening of each month, join a book group discussion either in person or online. This month, we'll discuss Florence Adler Swims Forever by Rachel Beanland (a fiction finalist for the 2021 People’s Choice Award).


In October, we'll discuss You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington by Alexis Coe (a nonfiction finalist for the 2021 People’s Choice Award and the subject of our November 2021 Weinstein Author Series talk).


Library of Virginia loaner books are unavailable at this time, but check your local public library for curbside checkout or digital download. This book is available at the Virginia Shop online and other online retail outlets. For more information, contact Nan Carmack at nan.carmack@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3792.

workshop

GENEALOGY WORKSHOP

Cemetery Records at the Library of Virginia 

TimeFriday, September 10, 2021 from 10:00 AM–11:45 AM
LocationOnline
Price$15 ($10 for Library of Virginia members)

***Due to numerous requests for our genealogy workshops to remain virtual with concerns stemming from COVID-19, the Library has decided to convert our in-person genealogy workshops back to virtual events for the remainder of 2021. We apologize for any inconvenience. Dates and registrations will remain the same.***


Library of Virginia senior reference archivist Dawn Tinnell will provide an overview of cemetery records and other related death records and how they can help with genealogical research. Virginia Commonwealth University professor of history Ryan K. Smith will give examples of what he has found in cemetery records and related death records and how those findings relate to what can be discovered in the cemeteries themselves. Contact Ashley Ramey at ashley.ramey@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3001 for more information.

Register Here
book talk

WEINSTEIN AUTHOR SERIES EVENT: KAREN L. COX

No Common Ground: Confederate Monuments and the Ongoing Fight for Racial Justice

TimeTuesday, September 14, 2021 from 6:00 PM–7:30 PM
LocationLecture Hall
PriceFree

Please join us for a talk by author and historian Dr. Karen L. Cox on her book No Common Ground: Confederate Monuments and the Ongoing Fight for Racial Justice. In this eye-opening narrative of the efforts to raise, preserve, protest, and remove Confederate monuments, Dr. Cox depicts what these statues meant to those who erected them and how a movement arose to force a reckoning. When it comes to Confederate monuments, there is no common ground. Polarizing debates over their meaning have intensified into legislative maneuvering to preserve the statues, legal battles to remove them, and rowdy crowds taking matters into their own hands. These conflicts have raged for well over a century—but they've never been as intense as they are today. Dr. Cox shows the forces that drove white southerners to construct beacons of white supremacy, as well as the ways that anti-monument sentiment, largely stifled during the Jim Crow era, returned with the civil rights movement and gathered momentum in the decades after the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Civil rights activists, Black elected officials, and movements of ordinary people have fought to take the story back. 


The Carole Weinstein Author Series supports the literary arts by bringing both new and well-known authors to the Library of Virginia through online or in-person events. Free and open to the public, the series focuses on Virginia authors and Virginia subjects across all genres. This book is available online from the Virginia Shop. For more information, contact Dawn Greggs at 804.692.3813 or dawn.greggs@lva.virginia.gov.

Register Here
panel discussion

"From Rested and Readied"

Part 6 of the JXN Project Summer Lecture Series

TimeWednesday, September 15, 2021 from 7:00 PM–8:00 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree, but registration required.

The JXN Project celebrates the 150th anniversary of the Jackson Ward neighborhood with a year-long sesquicentennial celebration. Join the Library of Virginia as we partner with The JXN Project and Richmond Public Library to offer a six-part summer lecture series on Jackson Ward history. The sixth and final lecture, a precursor to the Afrikana Independent Film Festival, will be moderated by Gary Flowers and explore the lives of the notable Jackson Wardians who will be honored with street designations as part of "Unveiling The Vanguard" during the Second Street Festival


The JXN Project's co-creators, Enjoli Moon and Dr. Sesha Joi Moon, seek to recontextualize and more accurately capture the role of Richmond, Virginia and Jackson Ward in the Black American experience. Through a year-long celebration of Jackson Ward's 150th anniversary, a set of initiatives to rename the ward's streets after former residents, and a push to increase Black representation in Richmond's historical preservation bodies, The JXN Project will partner with community stakeholders to build a Richmond that honors Black excellence. Learn more at thejxnproject.com.


The public is invited to attend these lectures, comment, and become part of the process of this historic justice initiative.

Register Here
panel discussion

FORUM FRIDAYS: VIRTUAL VIRGINIA FORUM TALKS

Family Values Rhetoric & the Struggle for LGBTQ Equality in Virginia

TimeFriday, September 17, 2021 from 12:00 PM–1:00 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree, but registration required.

Join us for a series of virtual presentations on Virginia history and culture from scholars across the state. This series offers some of the most compelling sessions that had been proposed for the 2020 Virginia Forum conference, which was cancelled due to the pandemic. The annual event brings together teachers, students, and professionals interested in Virginia history and culture to present, discuss, and reconsider the story of the commonwealth. Free and open to the general public, this collaboration with the Library of Virginia will share the online sessions with a wider audience. Events are scheduled for July 23, August 6, August 20, and September 17, 2021.


On September 17, professors Amy Bertsch, Charles H. Ford, and Jeffrey L. Littlejohn offer a new perspective on contemporary Virginia history as they discuss the family values rhetoric of the 20th century and the way it affected members of the LGBTQ community. Bertsch will explore how newspaper reporters, community members, and legal figures perceived and depicted gender nonconforming African Americans in the years before queer liberation and the civil rights movement. Ford will then examine the infamous Bottoms v. Bottoms case in which a woman sued her own lesbian daughter for custody of her grandchild. And, finally, Littlejohn will analyze the legal campaign for marriage equality in Virginia with a focus on historical arguments that linked the ban on same-sex marriage to Virginia’s history of racial and gender discrimination.


For more information, contact Ashley Ramey at ashley.ramey@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3001.

Register Here
book club

Common Ground Virginia History Virtual Book Group

TimeTuesday, September 21, 2021 from 6:00 PM–7:30 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree, but registration required.

Read and discuss compelling nonfiction books handpicked by Library staff that explore Virginia history, society, and culture. This month, we'll discuss No Common Ground: Confederate Monuments and the Ongoing Fight for Racial Justice by Karen L. Cox. Next month, we'll discuss Dopesick by Beth Macy. Check your local public library or the FindItVA OverDrive collection to borrow titles, or purchase through the Virginia Shop or other online retailers.


We invite attendees to sign up for our monthly email list. Get meeting reminders as well as unique historical resources from the Library's collections selected to accompany upcoming discussions. To sign up for the list or request more information about this event, contact Becky Schneider at rebecca.schneider@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3550.


NOTE: Karen Cox is one of our Weinstein Author Series book talks on September 14th.

Register Here
panel discussion

Death and Rebirth in a Southern City: Richmond's Historic Cemeteries

TimeThursday, September 23, 2021 from 6:00 PM–7:30 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree, but registration required.

Join us for a virtual discussion of Ryan K. Smith's new book, Death and Rebirth in a Southern City: Richmond's Historic Cemeteries. Richmond holds one of the most dramatic landscapes of death in the nation, and this book offers the first comparative study of its cemeteries from the city's founding to the present, as well as efforts made toward their preservation. Using a range of archival sources, interviews, and investigations of the sites themselves, Smith traces the disparities between those grounds that have preserved the legacies of privileged whites and those that have been worn away, dug up, and built over, undermining the memories of African Americans and Indigenous tribes.


Gregg D. Kimball, the Library of Virginia's director of Public Services and Outreach, will moderate a conversation about the book and the topic with the author and panelists Kami Fletcher (associate professor of history at Albright College and president of the Collective for Radical Death Studies) and Ana Edwards (chair of the Sacred Ground Historical Reclamation Project, an initiative of the Defenders for Freedom, Justice and Equality). The book will be available for purchase in the Virginia Shop. For more information, contact Ashley Ramey, ashley.ramey@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3001.

Register Here
volunteer opportunity

Transcribe-a-versary Celebration

TimeSaturday, September 25, 2021 from 12:00 PM–2:00 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree, but registration required.

The Library invites past transcribers and new volunteers to join us for a virtual Transcribe-a-versary! This event celebrates the ongoing contributions of our volunteers and offers information about the future direction of Transcribe projects as well as the opportunity to provide feedback. Guest speaker Dr. Robert Nelson, director of the Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond, will provide insight into the possibilities of digital humanities projects. Guided by Library staff members, volunteers will then transcribe handwritten pages and historical newspapers by reading the text and typing it into digital form. We will conclude with a discussion about crowdsourcing projects at the Library of Virginia. Contact Sonya Coleman for more information at makinghistory@virginiamemory.com. Details about joining by Zoom will be shared with registrants the week before the event.

Register Here
exhibition

Columbia Pike: Through the Lens of Community

TimeTuesday, August 31, 2021–Saturday, January 8, 2022
LocationLibrary of Virginia Exhibition Gallery
PriceFree

Columbia Pike: Through the Lens of Community, a unique exhibition of photographs at the Library of Virginia, celebrates the extraordinary cultural diversity found within a single community in Northern Virginia. Columbia Pike originated in the 19th century as a toll road connecting rural Virginia with the nation's capital. Today, the Columbia Pike corridor is one of the most culturally diverse communities in the nation, and possibly in the world. More than 130 languages are spoken in Arlington County, with the densest concentration along the Pike. Unlike in many parts of the world, or even in our own country, however, the stunningly diverse group of people—representing every continent—who live and work there do so in relative harmony. 


Columbia Pike Documentary Project photographers, whose personal connections to the community allowed them to capture the strength, pride, resilience, elegance, and beauty of so many overlapping cultures, created the works on view. More than 70 of the thousands of photographs transferred to the Library of Virginia’s collections this spring will be highlighted in Columbia Pike: Through the Lens of Community. The exhibition will also include information about the neighborhood, the residents, and the photographers themselves. As the nation seems more divided than ever, this collection shows how one community is making diversity work.

Ongoing Gallery Exhibitions
exhibition

Columbia Pike: Through the Lens of Community

TimeTuesday, August 31, 2021–Saturday, January 8, 2022
LocationLibrary of Virginia Exhibition Gallery
PriceFree

Columbia Pike: Through the Lens of Community, a unique exhibition of photographs at the Library of Virginia, celebrates the extraordinary cultural diversity found within a single community in Northern Virginia. Columbia Pike originated in the 19th century as a toll road connecting rural Virginia with the nation's capital. Today, the Columbia Pike corridor is one of the most culturally diverse communities in the nation, and possibly in the world. More than 130 languages are spoken in Arlington County, with the densest concentration along the Pike. Unlike in many parts of the world, or even in our own country, however, the stunningly diverse group of people—representing every continent—who live and work there do so in relative harmony. 


Columbia Pike Documentary Project photographers, whose personal connections to the community allowed them to capture the strength, pride, resilience, elegance, and beauty of so many overlapping cultures, created the works on view. More than 70 of the thousands of photographs transferred to the Library of Virginia’s collections this spring will be highlighted in Columbia Pike: Through the Lens of Community. The exhibition will also include information about the neighborhood, the residents, and the photographers themselves. As the nation seems more divided than ever, this collection shows how one community is making diversity work.

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