October 2020 Events
panel discussion

VIRTUAL PANEL DISCUSSION

Unfinished Business: What the 19th Amendment Didn't Do

TimeThursday, October 8, 2020 from 5:00 PM–6:00 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree, but registration required

Moderated by Virginia State Senator Jennifer McClellan, this virtual panel discussion explores the struggle for the vote that remained for many citizens after the passage of the 19th Amendment. Extending the right to vote to women in 1920 was a milestone in American history, but much work remained to ensure that all citizens had a fair and equal voice in governing the country and shaping its policies. Historians Lauranett Lee (a visiting lecturer in the University of Richmond’s Jepson School of Leadership Studies) and Megan Taylor-Shockley (an author and former professor of history at Clemson University) discuss the fundamental question of citizenship through obstacles that limited suffrage to some Americans, including the Equal Rights Amendment (first introduced in 1923), extending citizenship to America’s indigenous peoples, eliminating the poll tax and literacy tests, and the continuing advocacy for restoration of rights to felons. This event complements the Library’s exhibitions We Demand: Women’s Suffrage in Virginia and Unfinished Business. For more information, contact Emma Ito at emma.ito@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3726.

Register Here
closing

Closed for Columbus Day and Yorktown Victory Day   

TimeMonday, October 12, 2020 from 9:00 AM–5:00 PM

literary awards

Library of Virginia Literary Awards: Fiction Discussion Panel

TimeTuesday, October 13, 2020 from 6:00 PM–7:00 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree

Join us as Bethanne Patrick, writer, editor, and freelance book reviewer for the Washington Post and Los Angeles Times, moderates a conversation with Fiction Award finalists Angie Kim, author of Miracle Creek; Tara Laskowski, author of One Night Gone; and Christopher Tilghman, author of Thomas and Beal in the Midi. The winner will be announced during the Literary Awards Virtual Celebration on Saturday, October 17, 2020.


Literary Awards week is a great time to help support the Library’s programs, special projects, and exhibitions. Generous donors have pledged over $15,000 in challenge support to be matched throughout the week. To help us meet our goal, please consider making a contribution.

Learn More
literary awards

Library of Virginia Literary Awards: Poetry Discussion Panel

TimeWednesday, October 14, 2020 from 6:00 PM–7:00 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree

Join us as Poet Laureate of Virginia Luisa A. Igloria moderates a conversation with Poetry Award finalists Lauren K. Alleyne, author of Honeyfish; David Huddle, author of My Surly Heart; and Benjamín Naka-Hasebe Kingsley, author of Colonize Me. The winner will be announced during the Literary Awards Virtual Celebration on Saturday, October 17, 2020.


Literary Awards week is a great time to help support the Library’s programs, special projects, and exhibitions. Generous donors have pledged over $15,000 in challenge support to be matched throughout the week. To help us meet our goal, please consider making a contribution.

Learn More
book club

Virtual Literary Virginia Book Group

TimeWednesday, October 14, 2020 from 6:00 PM–7:30 PM
LocationVirtual Meeting
PriceFree

For now our book group meetings will be virtual. Please log in at 6:00 PM through either the GoogleMeets link or the phone number below:


Meeting ID

meet.google.com/hfh-uwev-jeu 


Phone Number

(US)+1 347-941-2137

PIN: 343 725 357#


Read and discuss the best of today's Virginia literature—books by Library of Virginia Literary Award winners and finalists in fiction and nonfiction. This month, we'll discuss The Gifted School by Bruce Holsinger (a 2020 People’s Choice Fiction finalist). In November we'll discuss Slay Like a Mother by Katherine Wintsch.


Library of Virginia loaner books are unavailable at this time, but check your local public library for curbside checkout or digital download. This book is also available at the Virginia Shop online and other online retail outlets. For more information, contact Nan Carmack at nan.carmack@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3792.

literary awards

Library of Virginia Literary Awards: Nonfiction Discussion Panel

TimeThursday, October 15, 2020 from 6:00 PM–7:00 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree

Join us as Traci Thomas, host of the podcast The Stacks, moderates a conversation with Nonfiction Award finalists Tressie McMillan Cottom, author of Thick: And Other Essays; Mary M. Lane, author of Hitler’s Last Hostages: Looted Art and the Soul of the Third Reich; and Erik Nielson and Andrea L. Dennis, authors of Rap on Trial: Race, Lyrics, and Guilt in America. The winner will be announced during the Literary Awards Virtual Celebration on Saturday, October 17, 2020.


Literary Awards week is a great time to help support the Library’s programs, special projects, and exhibitions. Generous donors have pledged over $15,000 in challenge support to be matched throughout the week. To help us meet our goal, please consider making a contribution.

Learn More
virtual workshop

CENSUS RECORDS GENEALOGY VIRTUAL WORKSHOP

Historic Census Records at the Library of Virginia

TimeFriday, October 16, 2020 from 10:00 AM–11:00 AM
LocationOnline
Price$15 ($10 for Semper Virginia Society members)

United States Census records provide a framework for initial genealogical research as well as offering significant clues to comprehending a bigger picture of a person’s life - his or her family relations, community, migration, and livelihood. Led by Library of Virginia editor John Deal, this workshop will demonstrate research strategies, tips for finding missing ancestors, and ways to mine the census for more information. Contact Ashley Ramey at ashley.ramey@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3001 for more information. 

Register Here
literary awards

Art in Literature: The Mary Lynn Kotz Award

TimeFriday, October 16, 2020 from 6:00 PM–7:30 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree

The Library of Virginia and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts present the Art in Literature: The Mary Lynn Kotz Award. This year’s recipient is author Philip J. Deloria for Becoming Mary Sully: Toward an American Indian Abstract. Join us for a virtual presentation exploring the relationship between literature and the visual arts. This unique award, established in 2013, is named in honor of Mary Lynn Kotz, author of the award-winning biography Rauschenberg: A Life. The award recognizes an outstanding book published in the previous year that is written primarily in response to a work (or works) of art while also showing the highest literary quality as a creative or scholarly work. Deloria will also be recognized on Saturday, October 17, 2020, during the Literary Awards Virtual Celebration.


Literary Awards week is a great time to help support the Library’s programs, special projects, and exhibitions. Generous donors have pledged over $15,000 in challenge support to be matched throughout the week. To help us meet our goal, please consider making a contribution.

Learn More
literary awards

23rd Annual Library of Virginia Literary Awards

Virtual Celebration

TimeSaturday, October 17, 2020 from 6:00 PM–8:00 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree

Celebrate the Library of Virginia Literary Awards virtually this year with featured speaker Douglas Brinkley, a U.S. presidential historian and best-selling author, and award-winning Virginia author Adriana Trigiani, who returns as host. This annual event, sponsored by Dominion Energy, attracts library supporters, authors, publishers, and those who enjoy the written word. Links for viewing will be posted on the Library’s calendar and Facebook page.


Literary Awards week is a great time to help support the Library’s programs, special projects, and exhibitions. Generous donors have pledged over $15,000 in challenge support to be matched throughout the week. To help us meet our goal, please consider making a contribution.

Learn More
lecture

VIRTUAL ARCHIVES MONTH TALK

Public Records, Public Trust: Records Management in Government

TimeTuesday, October 20, 2020 from 12:00 PM–1:00 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree

What makes a record a public record? What rules apply to the management of public records? When does a public record become archival? What is the role of records management in government transparency? In honor of Archives Month, explore these questions and more with Michael Strom, State Archivist and director of Government Records Services, and Chad Owen, records management coordinator. Open to the general public, this presentation is intended for Virginia state and local government employees and agency records managers. This is a virtual event hosted on Zoom.


Under the authority of the Virginia Public Records Act, the Library of Virginia’s Records Management section assists state and local government in ensuring that public records are maintained and available throughout their life cycle. Records Management supports the efficient and economical management of public records by publishing records retention and disposition schedules, presenting workshops, monitoring the disposal of nonpermanent records, and assisting with the transfer of permanent records to the Archives.


Join through Zoom 

https://zoom.us/j/96033245187


Meeting ID: 960 3324 5187

Passcode: 718473


One tap mobile

+13017158592,,96033245187#,,,,,,0#,,718473# US (Germantown)

+13126266799,,96033245187#,,,,,,0#,,718473# US (Chicago)


Dial by your location

+1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)

+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)

+1 646 558 8656 US (New York)

+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)

+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)

+1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)

lecture

17TH ANNUAL VOORHEES VIRTUAL LECTURE SERIES

17th-Century Maps of Virginia, Maryland & the Southeast, 1590–1720

TimeThursday, October 22, 2020 from 7:00 PM–8:30 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree

Explorations of the Albemarle Sound region and the first English settlements of the Roanoke Islands in the 1580s are the topic of the 17th Annual Alan M. and Nathalie P. Voorhees Lecture on the History of Cartography—this year presented as a series of virtual events featuring speakers Dr. Larry Tise, journalist Andrew Lawler, and Library of Virginia senior map archivist Cassandra Britt Farrell.


Please join us online for a talk by Cassandra Britt Farrell, the senior map archivist in the Library’s Manuscripts and Special Collections Department, on 17th-Century Maps of Virginia, Maryland & the Southeast, 1590–1720. Farrell specializes in maps of Virginia and colonial American history. Captain John Smith’s map of Virginia—considered the “mother” map of Virginia—influenced many European mapmakers as they printed maps of the colony for inclusion in atlases. However, it is not the only 17th-century map of the colony worthy of study by historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, and other researchers of colonial Virginia. This talk will review those maps published between the years 1590 to 1720 that are not derivatives of Smith’s famous map and will explore the differences between the “states” published for each. Learn about the individuals who published these maps and in which atlases and books the maps were originally included.


This series is hosted by the Fry-Jefferson Map Society. Registrants will receive an email with a link to participate in the virtual event, which will launch at 7:00 PM. For more information or to become a member of the Fry-Jefferson Map Society, contact Dawn Greggs at 804.692.3813 or dawn.greggs@lva.virginia.gov


Note: Questions for the speaker can be entered through the registration link.

Register Here
book talk

VIRTUAL BOOK TALK

The Campaign for Woman Suffrage in Virginia

TimeThursday, October 29, 2020 from 12:00 PM–1:00 PM
LocationOnline
PriceFree, but registration required

Celebrate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment! Join us for a talk with the authors of The Campaign for Woman Suffrage in Virginia, a new book that explores the remarkable achievements of women who fought for the right to vote in the commonwealth. Brent Tarter, Marianne E. Julienne, and Barbara Batson—whose research unearthed new information and discovered women who have never before appeared in history books—are also the curators of the Library of Virginia’s exhibition We Demand: Women’s Suffrage in Virginia, running through May 28, 2021, in the Exhibition Gallery. The book is available at the Virginia Shop and from other online retailers. For more information, contact Emma Ito at emma.ito@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3726.


Register Here
Ongoing Gallery Exhibitions
exhibition

Unfinished Business

TimeMonday, February 24, 2020–Friday, May 28, 2021
LocationLobby
PriceFree

Extending the right to vote to women in 1920 was a milestone in American history. But much work remained to ensure that all citizens had a fair and equal voice in governing the country and shaping its policies. Unfinished Business, a series of panel displays near the Exhibition Gallery, explores the fundamental question of citizenship through obstacles that limited suffrage to some Americans, including the Equal Rights Amendment (first introduced in 1923), extending citizenship to America’s indigenous peoples, eliminating the poll tax and literacy tests, and the continuing advocacy for restoration of rights to felons. This exhibition complements We Demand: Women’s Suffrage in Virginia, running through May 28, 2021, in the Exhibition Gallery.

exhibition

We Demand:

Women's Suffrage in Virginia

TimeMonday, January 13, 2020–Friday, May 28, 2021
LocationExhibition Gallery and Lobby
PriceFree

This year marks the centennial of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution guaranteeing women's right to vote. The story of Virginia's suffragists and their contributions to the fight for woman suffrage is little known. We Demand: Women's Suffrage in Virginia reveals how women created two statewide organizations to win the right to vote. Virginia suffragists were a remarkable group of talented and dedicated women who have largely been forgotten. They were artists and writers, business and professional women, and educators and reformers who marched in parades, rallied at the state capitol, spoke to crowds on street corners, staffed booths at state and county fairs, lobbied legislators and congressmen, picketed the White House, and even went to jail. At the centenary of woman suffrage, these remarkable women are at last recognized for their important achievements and contributions.


Items on display include suffrage postcards and memorabilia such as pinback buttons and badges, as well as banners from the Virginia branch of the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage, photographs, and film footage. This exhibition is a project of the Task Force to Commemorate the Centennial Anniversary of Women’s Right to Vote. 

Ongoing Traveling Exhibitions

New Virginians: 1619–2019 & Beyond at Ormond Stone Middle School in Centreville

TimeMonday, August 24, 2020–Saturday, October 3, 2020
LocationOrmond Stone Middle School (Centreville)
PriceFree

Come visit the traveling version of the exhibition New Virginians: 1619–2019 & Beyond, which explores the changing demographics of the commonwealth on the eve of the 2020 federal census through a series of interviews with first-generation immigrants and refugees who arrived in Virginia after 1976. Produced jointly by the Library of Virginia and Virginia Humanities, the exhibition is a Legacy Project of the 2019 Commemoration, American Evolution. For more information, please contact Barbara C. Batson, exhibitions coordinator, at barbara.batson@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3518.

Full Itinerary

We Demand: Women's Suffrage in Virginia at Slover Library (Norfolk)

TimeMonday, September 28, 2020–Saturday, November 7, 2020
LocationSlover Library (Norfolk)
PriceFree

To commemorate the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting women the right to vote, the traveling exhibition, We Demand: Women’s Suffrage in Virginia uses text and images to trace the history of the woman suffrage movement in Virginia from 1909 until 1920. For more information, please contact Barbara C. Batson, exhibitions coordinator, at barbara.batson@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3518.

Full Itinerary

New Virginians: 1619–2019 & Beyond at Matoaca High School (Chesterfield)

TimeMonday, October 5, 2020–Saturday, November 14, 2020
LocationMatoaca High School (Chesterfield)
PriceFree

Come visit the traveling version of the exhibition New Virginians: 1619–2019 & Beyond, which explores the changing demographics of the commonwealth on the eve of the 2020 federal census through a series of interviews with first-generation immigrants and refugees who arrived in Virginia after 1976. Produced jointly by the Library of Virginia and Virginia Humanities, the exhibition is a Legacy Project of the 2019 Commemoration, American Evolution. For more information, please contact Barbara C. Batson, exhibitions coordinator, at barbara.batson@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3518.

Full Itinerary

We Demand: Women's Suffrage in Virginia at Henrico County Public Library (Varina)

TimeMonday, October 12, 2020–Saturday, November 21, 2020
LocationHenrico County Public Library (Varina)
PriceFree

To commemorate the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting women the right to vote, the traveling exhibition, We Demand: Women’s Suffrage in Virginia uses text and images to trace the history of the woman suffrage movement in Virginia from 1909 until 1920. For more information, please contact Barbara C. Batson, exhibitions coordinator, at barbara.batson@lva.virginia.gov or 804.692.3518.

Full Itinerary
facebook twitter youtube instagram view more