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March 2015

Inclement Weather
Thursday, March 05, 2015

Due to inclement weather, Executive Branch Agencies in the Richmond Metropolitan area, including the Library of Virginia, will close two hours early today Thursday, March 5, 2015. The Library's lobby, reading rooms, exhibition, and stacks will close at 3 pm.


Inclement Weather
Friday, March 06, 2015

Due to inclement weather, Executive Branch Agencies in the Richmond Metropolitan area, including the Library of Virginia, will open with a 2-hour delay on Friday, March 6, 2015.


The Joys and Challenges of Historical Research
Tuesday, March 17, 2015
Time: Noon–1:00 PM
Place: Conference Rooms,  Free

Joanne Yeck and Shelly Murphy, longtime researchers at the Library of Virginia, will offer an informative discussion of the practical challenges of working with burned counties, incomplete records, and African American family histories.

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Solomon Northup and the Tragic Voyage of the Orleans
Friday, March 20, 2015
Time: 5:30 PM–7:00 PM
Place: NEW LOCATION: Conference Rooms, Library of Virginia,  Free, but registration required. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/solomon-northup-and-the-tragic-voyage-of-the-orleans-by-dr-calvin-schermerhorn-tickets-15600471430

Arizona State University scholar Calvin Schermerhorn recounts the life of Solomon Northup, the central character of the movie 12 Years a Slave, and his voyage on the slaver Orleans as a case study of the complexities of the interstate slave trade. This program complements To Be Sold: Virginia and the American Slave Trade.

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To Be Sold: The American Slave Trade from Virginia to New Orleans
Saturday, March 21, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM–5:00 PM
Place: Lecture Hall,  Free, but reservations required. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/to-be-sold-the-american-slave-trade-from-virginia-to-new-orleans-teleconference-symposium-tickets-15220873041

To Be Sold: The American Slave Trade from Virginia to New Orleans” is a day-long symposium that will take place in both Richmond, Virginia, and New Orleans, Louisiana, on Saturday, March 21, 2015. Morning sessions will be held in Richmond and simulcast in New Orleans, while afternoon sessions will be held in New Orleans and simulcast in Richmond. Participants at both locations will be able to engage in live discussions with attendees and presenters at both sites. Thanks to funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, participants will be able to attend the event free of charge.This program complements To Be Sold: Virginia and the American Slave Trade.


2015 Virginia Women in History Program & Reception
Thursday, March 26, 2015
Time: 6:00 PM–8:00 PM
Place: Lecture Hall,  Free, but reservations requested, call 804-692-3999.

Join the Library of Virginia and host May-Lily Lee in recognizing eight exceptional Virginia women who have made important contributions to Virginia, the nation, and the world. A reception follows the program. The Richmond Times-Dispatch and Richmond.com are the print and digital media sponsor for the 2015 Virginia Women in History program. Check The Times-Dispatch each Tuesday and Thursday March 3 through 26 for Virginia Women in History profiles. Free parking in the Library's underground garage (accessible from Eighth or Ninth street). Call 804.692.3592 for more information.


To Be Sold: Virginia and the American Slave Trade
Monday, October 27, 2014—Saturday, May 30, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM–5:00 PM
Place: Lobby and Exhibition Hall,  Free

This groundbreaking exhibition explores the pivotal role that Richmond played in the domestic slave trade. Curated by University of Virginia professor Maurie McInnis, To Be Sold draws from her recent book, Waiting to Be Sold: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade, and is anchored by a series of paintings and engravings by Eyre Crowe, a British artist who witnessed the slave trade as he traveled across the United States in 1853. This internal trade accounted for the largest forced migration of people in the United States, moving as many as two thirds of a million people from the Upper South to the Cotton South. Virginia was the largest mass exporter of enslaved people through the Richmond market, making the trade the most important economic activity in antebellum Virginia. This exhibition is not merely a story of numbers and economic impact, but also one that focuses on individuals and the impact that the trade had on enslaved people.