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University of Virginia, Health Sciences Library Images
 

  

"Admissions" is a page from the University of Virginia Hospital Admissions book, October 1910, showing on line two a diagnosis for sickle cell anemia — "crescentic anemia" — just after that syndrome was first identified.  [patient names have been erased to comply with HIPPA]

Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia

"Admissions"
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"Carmichael Letter"
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"Carmichael Letter" is a single example of a letter from a larger collection of correspondence addressed to Fredericksburg-Virginia physician James Carmichael.  These unusual letters from patients to their physician date from the second and third decades of the 19th century and describe symptoms and treatments for family members as well as African-American slaves.

Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia

  

"Lapdesk" is a mid-19th century portable desk pictured with an early-19th-century indenture from the Henry Rose Carter Papers.

Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia

"Lapdesk"
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"MedicineChest"
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"MedicineChest" is a mid-19th physician's portable formulary, containing medical and pharmaceutical supplies.

Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia

  

"Tourniquet" is a detail from the medicine chest above.

Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia

"Tourniquet"
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"Walter Reed"
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"Walter Reed" shows Virginia physician and yellow-fever conqueror Walter Reed on assignment at a western United States military post in the fourth quarter of the 19th century.

Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia

  

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